Acute Leukemia is a rapidly progressing cancer that qualifies you for Social Security disability benefits. Acute Leukemia starts when a cell changes and becomes a leukemia cell. Because it no longer matures the way it should, it grows out of control. Often, it divides to make new cells faster than normal.

Leukemia cells also don’t die when they should. This allows them to build up in the bone marrow, crowding out normal cells. Then, the cancer causes large numbers of immature white blood cells to enter the blood stream. The cells can travel to your organs. Once inside the organ, the leukemia cells make it so the organ doesn’t work properly.

Because it is a disabling cancer, Acute leukemia is on SSA’s compassionate allowances list. Learn more information about compassionate allowances.

Acute Leukemia

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN TYPES OF LEUKEMIA

If the growth of the white blood cells involves the lymphoid line, then your disease is acute lymphocytic leukemia. Similarly, if the growth of the white blood cells involves the myeloid line, then you have acute myeloid leukemia. Acute lymphocytic leukemia is also known as acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Acute lymphocytic leukemia is the most common type of cancer in children. If the diagnosis occurs in a child, then there is good chance for a cure through treatment. Acute lymphocytic leukemia can also occur in adults. However, if you are an adult with the disease, the chance of a cure is far less.

DIAGNOSTIC TESTING FOR ACUTE LEUKEMIA

The diagnosis of Acute Leukemia is made by physical examination and history. Your doctor will then perform a complete blood count. Also, your doctor may perform specific tests. These include a peripheral blood smear and bone marrow aspiration and biopsy. Your doctor may also do imaging test or a spinal fluid test. In the case of Acute Leukemia, bone marrow testing is definitive of the disease.

POSSIBLE TESTS FOR LEUKEMIA

Acute Leukemia mind map, medical concept for presentations and reports

PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS OF ACUTE LEUKEMIA

The early symptoms of acute leukemia may be similar to the flu. Symptoms include:

THE THREE PHASES OF TREATMENT FOR ACUTE LEUKEMIA

Cancer specialists treat acute leukemia in three phases. Induction therapy is the first phase of treatment. The purpose of induction therapy is to kill the leukemia cells in the blood and bone marrow. If the leukemia cells die, then your cancer goes into remission.

Post-remission therapy is the second phase of treatment. It begins once the leukemia is in remission. The purpose of the second phase of treatment is to kill any remaining leukemia cells that may not be active. However, those cells could cause a relapse, so the goal is to eliminate them.

The third phase of treatment is maintenance therapy. The goal of this phase is to prevent a relapse of the acute leukemia. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment used during this phase. It involves the use of high-dose, intense drugs and direct installation of chemotherapy into the spinal fluid. Additionally, your doctor may recommend high-dose stem cell transplantation. It is not uncommon for individuals in this phase to develop severe infectious and bleeding complications. If this happens, then you will need an inpatient stay in the hospital with IV antibiotics and transfusion support.

POSSIBLE TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR ACUTE LEUKEMIA

Treatments for acute leukemia may include:

RISK FACTORS FOR ACUTE LEUKEMIA

There are factors that may increase the risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia. These factors include:

ACUTE LEUKEMIA MEETS LISTING 13.06A AND 113.06A

13.06 Leukemia. (See 13.00K2.)

A. Acute leukemia (including T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma). Consider under a disability until at least 24 months from the date of diagnosis or relapse, or at least 12 months from the date of bone marrow or stem cell transplantation, whichever is later. Thereafter, evaluate any residual impairment(s) under the criteria for the affected body system.

OR

B. Chronic myelogenous leukemia, as described in 1 or 2:

1. Accelerated or blast phase (see 13.00K2b). Consider under a disability until at least 24 months from the date of diagnosis or relapse, or at least 12 months from the date of bone marrow or stem cell transplantation, whichever is later. Thereafter, evaluate any residual impairment(s) under the criteria for the affected body system.

2. Chronic phase, as described in a or b:

a. Consider under a disability until at least 12 months from the date of bone marrow or stem cell transplantation. Thereafter, evaluate any residual impairment(s) under the criteria for the affected body system.

b. Progressive disease following initial anticancer therapy.

CHILDHOOD LISTING 113.06  FOR LEUKEMIA

113.06 Leukemia (See 113.00K2)

A. Acute leukemia (including all types of lymphoblastic lymphoma and juvenile chronic myelogenous leukemia (JCML). Consider under a disability until at least 24 months from the date of diagnosis or relapse, or at least 12 months from the date of bone marrow or stem cell transplantation, whichever is later. Thereafter, evaluate any residual impairment(s) under the criteria for the affected body system.

OR

B. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (except JCML), as described in 1 or 2:

1. Accelerated or blast phase (see 113.00K2b). Consider under a disability until at least 24 months from the date of diagnosis or relapse, or at least 12 months from the date of bone marrow or stem cell transplantation, whichever is later. Thereafter, evaluate any residual impairment(s) under the criteria for the affected body system.

2. Chronic phase, as described in a or b:

a. Consider under a disability until at least 12 months from the date of bone marrow or stem cell transplantation. Thereafter, evaluate any residual impairment(s) under the criteria for the affected body system.

b. Progressive disease following initial anticancer therapy.

CANNON DISABILITY CAN WIN YOUR SSD & SSI DISABILITY BENEFITS

Throughout your disability case, our attorneys and paralegals help you collect your medical records. We will help you prove your acute leukemia meets the SSA’s disability criteria. If you have another form of cancer, like multiple myeloma, then read here.

Medical records are crucial to winning your case. Learn more about the importance of medical records here. Once the evidence is complete, your case will be ready for a hearing. Your day in court is before an administrative law judge for the Social Security Administration. And, you are the main witness.

Prior to your hearing, we will meet with you to talk about the judge’s questions. We will try to explain what kinds of questions you will be asked. Also, we will also try to prepare you to answer those questions. You will be answering questions about your disability.

For example, you will need to be able to talk about your ability to lift, sit, stand, and walk, throughout an eight hour work day. This is known as your residual functional capacity. You will also need to discuss whether your disability impacts your ability to concentrate and focus on work tasks. If you have acute leukemia, you will also need to describe how your treatment affects your ability to work.

HIRE CANNON DISABILITY TO BE YOUR DISABILITY ADVOCATE

If you have acute leukemia, a medical expert may testify at your hearing about whether you meet SSA’s listing for cancer. If you don’t hire an attorney, then there is a good chance you will not be able to cross-examine the medical or vocational expert at your hearing. You also may not know what kinds of questions the judge will ask. Similarly, you may not be ready to answer those questions in the proper way. Therefore, it is likely that you will not win your case at the hearing level.

Don’t take that chance. Hire a lawyer in Las Vegas, Nevada and Salt Lake City, Utah with the experience you need to win your disability case. Learn about Nevada Disability benefits here. Also, learn about Utah Disability benefits information here. If you need a disability lawyer in Colorado we can help you. Likewise, we represent claimants for California disability benefits too.

DISABILITY CASES ARE OUR SPECIALTY

In the last 30 years, we have won over 20,000 disability hearings for our clients. Additionally, we have won over $100 million in ongoing and past-due SSD and SSI disability benefits for our clients.

During our time in business, we have seen the Social Security Administration change their policies. Over time, it has become more difficult to win Social Security cases, even if you have acute leukemia. The medical evidence to prove that you meet SSA’s listing requirements is more stringent. Additionally, those who come to the hearing without representation are typically not successful in winning benefits.

If you have any type of cancer, then you know you are not going to be able to work for more than 12 months. Therefore, you need to apply for disability benefits. You need to do so right away. Don’t wait. Apply for benefits even if you think you might go back to work. If you do go back to work, then you can always withdraw the disability application.

Meanwhile, if you don’t go back to work, you have started the application process. SSDI benefits and SSI benefits are available to you if you start an application on the Social Security website.

HIRE CANNON DISABILITY WITH NO MONEY UPFRONT

We will use our skills to help you through the disability process. It is our goal to win your case. But, it also our goal to make it easier for you. We offer a free consultation. There is no obligation to become a client. If you call, then you can simply ask questions. We will answer. Also, if we can’t help you, we will refer you to someone who can.

It also doesn’t cost you any upfront money to hire us. Why? Because you only pay us an attorney fee if we win your case. This is a contingency fee. It means if we win, you pay us out of your back benefits. If you do not win, you do not pay an attorney fee. How much is the fee? It is 25% of your back benefit. Also, the fee is currently capped at $6000. It will be going up to a cap of $7200 in November 2022. However, even if the cap goes up, you never pay more than the cap. And, 25% is usually less than the cap. You will pay the lesser amount.

If there are costs in your case, then you pay those costs. But the costs are usually less than $100. Usually the only cost is to pay for a copy of your medical records. You owe costs whether we win or lose. Again, attorney fees are paid from your back benefit. But, to hire most lawyers, you have to pay upfront. We don’t work like that. You don’t have a job. So how can you pay? The only way for you to pay us is for us to win your case. So, that is our goal. Contact us today for help with your acute leukemia case.

LEARN ABOUT YOUR DISABILITY LEGAL TEAM

Cannon Disability brings over 60 years of legal experience to your disability case. For instance, Dianna Cannon has been representing people with disabilities since graduating from law school in 1992. Brett Bunkall and Andria Summers also have many years of litigation experience. During our time in practice, we have won many cancer cases. You can learn more on our About Us page.

If you or your child have acute leukemia, then contact us. We will help file your disability application. Also, we will make sure the SSA examines your case under the compassionate allowances rules. This will expedite your claim. You can trust that we will do everything in our power to win your SSD and SSI benefits for acute leukemia.

When you hire your disability attorney, choose one who has over 30 years of experience and a stellar record. You want the best disability attorney to help you. Find one who understands the system. You need to win benefits. In order to win, you should choose a law firm who only practices Social Security disability law. Choose Cannon Disability. Contact us now.

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